Writing Placement Test

To demonstrate college-ready writing skills, review the  testing scores summary  to determine if you need to take placement testing.

Writing Placement Test FAQ

Rather than taking two semesters to complete ENG-098 and ENG-101, if you're placed into ENG-098 can take both classes in just one semester. Some ENG-098 students take the ENG-101 course, with students placed directly into ENG-101. The ENG-098 class meets immediately following their ENG-101 class for additional support.

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All new degree-seeking students are required to demonstrate initial placement levels in English upon entry to the College in order to register for their first semester.

Additionally, any student wishing to register for courses may also need to demonstrate specific placement levels in order to satisfy a particular course prerequisite.

  • 19 or higher on the English portion of the ACT; or 480 on SAT or PSAT reading and writing; valid for 5 years; or
  • 4 or higher on the PARCC reading and writing assessment; or
  • Successful completion with a C or better of ENG 098 or LTC 099 at ECC or an equivalent course at a regionally accredited college (official transcripts required); or
  • Successful completion with a C or better in college-level courses at another college/university (official transcripts required); or
  • High school cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher on an unweighted 4.0 scale; or
  • GED score of 165 or higher or HiSet score of 15 or higher plus essay score of 4; or
  • A minimum score on AP, CLEP, or IB exam .
  • Attain the specified level from the ECC English placement test (valid for 5 years).

Using a computer, you will write an essay of approximately 2 pages in length. You will select one of three topics to focus your essay response. You are allowed to use a single piece of scratch paper. 

An effective essay will include each of the following:

  • A thesis or main idea;
  • Several paragraphs of sufficient, relevant, and specific detail or examples related to the topic selected based on your experience, observations, or readings;
  • Good organization, including an introduction, several body paragraphs, and a conclusion;
  • Correct grammar, spelling, and sentence structure.

Before you submit your essay, you should proofread (reread and correct) your essay. You can use spell-check and scratch paper. 

We strongly recommend that you take a few steps to get ready before taking your writing placement essay test. Students who review first typically do much better than those who do not. You can prepare by reviewing the sample scored essays .

Placement test results will be available within 7 business days.

We strongly recommend that you take a few steps to get ready before taking your Writing placement essay test. Students who review first typically do much better than those who do not. You can prepare by:

  • Review  the sample scored essays  

Writing placement test results will be available within 7 business days. Please plan accordingly to have the Writing placement test results completed prior to registration. You can view all placement test results on the  accessECC portal .

If your writing placement test score is:

  • 00 Prepare to retake the placement test.
  • 22, 23, 33 Developmental course required. Enroll in LTC-099 (College Literacy)
  • 44 Developmental courses required. Enroll in ENG-098 and ENG-101 (Accelerated Learning Program (ALP))
  • 55 No developmental course required. Enroll in college-ready courses, including ENG-101.

If you are not happy with your first attempt, you may retake the placement tests twice, providing you have not started a reading or English course. Once you have completed a reading or English class at ECC, you may retest with the approval of the placement coordinator. Your reading and writing placement results are valid for five years.

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Sample Essays

Below are two sample essays. Both essays are in response to the writing prompt below. The first sample essay demonstrates a readiness for English Composition I (a writing course required in all degree programs). The second contains weak areas demonstrating a need for additional support to foster success in English Composition I.

Penn College faculty evaluate essays based on the following:

  • organization
  • development of ideas
  • sentence structure
  • word choice
  • punctuation

The Faculty Evaluation section explains how effectively the student addressed each essay component and provides a rationale for each student’s placement.

English Composition I (ENL 111)

Write about a sport, hobby, or extra-curricular activity that you were involved with in high school and the impact that sport or activity had on your life. Be sure to clearly identify the sport or activity, and use specific details how this involvement made an impact on your life.

Student Essay:

One hobby or skill I pride myself in is my ability to cook, one that I have only obtained in my last 2 years working as a cook. When I started at Rotelli (an Italian restaurant in State College) it was right after my senior year in High school.

Fresh out of High school with no prior experience in the “real world” I was more or less forced to mature to meet the basic standards of a high-end kitchen employee. Allowing people to walk all over me due to my nonthreatening appearance and stoic resolve was no longer an option. Most of my coworkers were/are gruff, seasonal restaurant employees who will verbally “go for the throat” without a moments notice.

After several months of this environment and dreading going to work, I picked up on things to sharpen my wit, making what was before an entire night of being picked on into just playful verbal abuse. After this realization literally everything seemed less of a hassel, as well as near complete immunity to any sort of heckling. I even pushed the envelope by getting my lip pierced to “draw more heat” but no such insidents occurred.

In summation, the restaurant not only turned me into a good cook but also prepared me for the hassel and hardships of the real world, something that will be a definite benefit to me in the future.

Faculty Evaluation:

The essay shows a significant degree of organization . In the opening paragraph, the student mentions the specific hobby (cooking) that will be the subject of the essay, and then each paragraph relates to this particular hobby and its impact on the student’s life. The development of ideas occurs in each paragraph because the student writes about how the experience at this restaurant has impacted the student at the restaurant and the possible impact on the student’s future. There are some minor errors in punctuation , word choice , and spelling , but they do not take away from the reader’s ability to understand the paragraphs individually and the essay as a whole. The sentence structure is consistently strong throughout the essay, and evident in each paragraph. The essay contains specific details. The student connects the paragraphs to the prompt, clearly showing the impact that the experience at this restaurant has had on the student’s life. This student was placed in ENL111.

English Composition I (ENL 111) with English Composition Lab (ENL105)

Write about a sport, hobby, or extra-curricular activity that you were involved with in high school and the impact that sport or activity had on your life. Be sure to clearly identify the sport or activity, and use specific details about how this involvement made an impact on your life.

For my essay I will be choosing number two. The activity I will be writing about is highschool wrestling. I chose this sport in nineth grade. The reason I chose it was because I herd it had good rewards. I will be writing to you about the difficulties, rewards, experience, all what I learned from challenges.

There are multiple problems with word choice and spelling.

I will start with the difficulties. The one major difficulty for most people is eating. You must keep your weight minimal or you shouldnt even show up. What you learn from this is disapline. The second is fear with anciaty. You may want this actualy before a match. You get scared and prepare better. Your anciaty gives you speek and strength when you get on the mat. This teaches you how to use your weakness.

The ideas are not developed here. For instance, there are no details on why weight is a problem.

The last difficultie is physical pain and edurance. The best way to deal with it is to ignore it. Your mind is whats telling you it hurts and you need to stop. Tell it to ignore it and over time it will. This teacies you the more important thing which is you can do anything if you beleive you can. Those are some of the Difficulties and lessens you learn from wrestling.

In addition to spelling, punctuation, and grammar problems, this paragraph does not connect the ideas to each other, nor to the prompt.

The rewards you experience are great. The greatest reward is self greatness. When you train and win you feel accomplishd. You also have respect from your team and coach. It feels like you have some power. The last reward is the body. You get a great body from it and you feel great. Girls will offten give you attention for having it. Those are some of the rewards of wrestling.

Spelling issues are present and the ideas are listed, but not developed.

Over all highschool wrestling is a great way to improve yourself. I have learnd many skill and discipline from it. I have changed my life because of it. There will always be difficulties but you will always get somthing out of it. That is what I have to discuss on my activity.

While the student demonstrates some understanding of five paragraph format, there are numerous errors overall and little idea development in the essay.

The essay shows a degree of organization . In the opening paragraph, the student mentions three points to be made in the essay: difficulties, rewards, and experience. In the body of the essay, however, there is very little development of ideas . In the second paragraph, the student does not develop the idea of disciplined eating or anxiety. Paragraph four is a list of three rewards from wrestling, but the ideas are only listed, not developed. While there are some errors in punctuation , there are significant problems with sentence structure throughout the essay, especially with grammar , word choice , and spelling . These are pervasive throughout the essay. This student was placed in ENL111 with the additional support of ENL105.

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How to Write an Essay for a College Placement Exam

When just beginning or transferring to a college, students may be required to take a college placement exam that includes math, reading and writing tests. As part of the writing exam, students are expected to write an argumentative essay that states a clear position and provides analysis and evidence. The exam is rated and evaluated by faculty members at the college, and the scores determine into which level English course each student is placed.

Most college placement essays require students to read a set of circumstances and formulate an argument based on those circumstances. Often the prompts for college placement exams involve community- and school-related issues. Once you have carefully read and understood the prompt, decide which position you will take in your essay. Then take a few minutes to plan the basic structure, or outline, of the essay before you write it. Begin by writing a clear thesis statement -- a single sentence that sums up the main point of your entire essay. Then jot down and plan the order of the main supporting point and evidence you will present in the essay.

Writing the Essay

Typically, the essay portion of a college placement exam should be structured in a five-paragraph format consisting of an introduction, three body paragraphs and a conclusion. The thesis statement should be placed in the introduction and all subsequent information should directly support -- with explanation, analysis and specific examples -- the thesis statement. For example, if you are arguing that school days should be lengthened for public schools, you can support your claim with the following reasons: working parents will benefit from having their children stay longer in school, students will have fewer opportunities to get into trouble and students will be better prepared for college as a result of the additional schooling. Make certain as you write that each body paragraph's central idea is distinct from the others while still proving the thesis statement.

Part of the score of the college placement essay is determined by grammar, spelling and clarity of structure. Once you have completed the essay, take a few minutes to carefully read through it and proofread the text for errors. Reviewing the essay before you submit it also provides you the opportunity to develop or clarify the sub-arguments. Take time to read through and polish the essay to improve your chances of earning a higher score.

Time Management

A key strategy in the college placement exam essay is to take full advantage of all the time that is allotted. By managing your time wisely, you can allow sufficient time to plan, compose and proofread the essay before you submit it. Typically, each student is allowed 60 to 90 minutes to read the prompt, as well as to plan, write and review the essay. Keep your eye on the clock and allot at least 5 to 10 minutes at the start and the end of the allotted time to properly complete your pre- and post-writing.

  • ACT Compass: Writing Essay (e-Write)

Soheila Battaglia is a published and award-winning author and filmmaker. She holds an MA in literary cultures from New York University and a BA in ethnic studies from UC Berkeley. She is a college professor of literature and composition.

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How to Write an Essay for a College Placement Exam

How to Write an Introduction to an Analytical Essay

How to Write an Introduction to an Analytical Essay

Colleges rely on placement exam essays to identify a student’s writing level after high school. Because the test diagnoses areas for improvement in writing skill, the student should not fear that any judgments he makes in the essay are being graded. Though college placement essays are challenging, in the end it is the student who benefits when he is placed in the college English class most suited to his ability.

Spend the full hour you are given to write the essay. Goucher College recommends that such time is necessary to adequately develop your thoughts and present them in error-free text.

Confirm that you understand the question. Pay attention to words such as “evaluate,” “critique” or “present,” which give clues about the kind of response test reviewers are looking for. For example, if the question asks you to “evaluate” responses to a public policy decision, you should not write an essay that predicts whether the decision will produce good results. See “For Essay Questions” on the St. Benedict College-St. John’s University website.

Devote at least 5 minutes to pre-writing. If you don’t have time to outline your essay, at least write a simple list of the topics and points you intend to cover. Pick one or two points you consider strong and focus on supporting those rather than loading up your essay with one point after another, according to Middlesex Community College.

Write a clear, precise thesis statement. Then devote the rest of your essay to supporting it. Buttress your thesis with logical arguments to guarantee a higher score than an essay that tries to prove a point with circular reasoning. For example, support a thesis that the township should reduce the tax rate by arguing that residents are already overtaxed rather than by stating that it is good policy to reduce tax rates.

Engage the reader by varying sentence structure and vocabulary. Avoid writing every sentence with a subject followed by a verb and its direct object. Instead of writing, “The professor was impatient with the class and decided to give it a test,” try a variation such as “Impatient with his class, the professor decided it was time for a test.”

Save at least 5 minutes before time is up to proofread your essay. This can improve your score more than you expect. Correct spelling errors, avoid contractions and never write in the first or second person.

Check the college’s website for sample questions used on past examinations. Some, such as Middlesex County College, give examples of acceptable and poorly written essays that you can use to practice against.

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How to Write the Conclusion for a Persuasive Essay

How to write an essay with a thesis statement, how to write an opinion paragraph.

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How to Get an

How to Get an "A" in Honors English

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How to Write an Introduction to a Reflective Essay

  • Check the college’s website for sample questions used on past examinations. Some, such as Middlesex County College, give examples of acceptable and poorly written essays that you can use to practice against.

Michele Vrouvas has been writing professionally since 2007. In addition to articles for online publications, she is a litigation paralegal and has been a reporter for several local newspapers. A former teacher, Vrouvas also worked as a professional cook for five years. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in history from Caldwell College.

College Placement Test

Free Math and English Online Practice Exams

English Placement Test Essay Examples

You will find English placement test essay examples for your college entrance exam on this page.

In the writing section of the test, you will see literary nonfiction, essays, and informational passages.

The passages are around 300 words in length and there are five questions on each one.

Our free study guide will help you learn all of the grammar rules that are covered on the test.

Here is a free sample from our writing test PDF download :

Instructions: Read the first of our English placement test essay examples below and answer the questions that follow.

(1) The Department of Education in our state recently stated that more discipline is needed in the classroom. (2) Can you believe it? (3) It comes a bit late – I’m sure you’ll agree – but then the employee’s at the Department have had a great deal to think about over the years. (4) I don’t generally put much stock in the Department of Education’s opinions. (5) For several years, I’ve seen bad behavior in some schools and nothing serious being done about it. (6) In the meantime, the Department of Education has insinuated through its silence that everything was just great. (7) Evidently, however, now it’s not.

(8) Consider for instance, one of the children in my gifted class. (9) Since the school is discontinuing the program, he has to move back into the main school, understandably, he’s told me that he doesn’t want to go. (10) He wants to stay where there are very high standards of behavior and work. (11) He’s done so well. (12) His parents can’t believe the high level he achieves. (13) How great is that?

1. What is the best version of the underlined portion of sentence 3, reproduced below?

It comes a bit late – I’m sure you’ll agree – but then the employee’s at the Department have had a great deal to think about over the years.

A. Leave it as it is now. B. employees C. employees’ D. employees’s

2. What is the best decision regarding the underlined portion of sentence 7, reproduced below?

Evidently, however, now it’s not.

A. Leave it as it is now. B. Remove the comma after “Evidently” C. Remove the comma after “however” D. Delete “Evidently,” from the beginning of the sentence

3. What is the best decision regarding the underlined portion of sentence 9, reproduced below?

Since the school is discontinuing the program, he has to move back into the main school, understandably, he’s told me that he doesn’t want to go.

A. Leave it as it is now. B. Place a period after “school” and begin a new sentence with “Understandably,” C. Use a dash after “school” instead of a comma D. Use a colon after “school” instead of a comma

English Placement Test Essay Examples – Answers

1. The correct answer is B. The word “employees” forms the grammatical subject of the sentence. The writer is speaking about all of the workers at the Department of Education, so we need to use the plural form. An apostrophe is not required since we do not need the possessive form.

2. The correct answer is A. The sentence is best as it is written in the original essay. A comma needs to be placed after “evidently” as it is a transition word used at the beginning of the sentence. A comma also needs to be used after “however, because it is used within the sentence. The use of both words in this sentence serves as a logical connector to the previous argument that the writer is making.

3. The correct answer is B. We have two complete sentences here since each has its own grammatical subject and verb. So, a period should be used after “school” and a new sentence should be made starting with the next word.

Online Placement Test Sample

More English Test Practice

Sentence Skills

Sentence Completion

Sentence Relationships

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English Placement Test (EPT) & Math Placement Test (MPT)

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English Placement Test (EPT)

Why do students need to take the ept.

  • Some students are very proficient in oral communication skills but cannot yet write at an academic level.
  • Some students score well on standardized tests, such as IELTS or TOEFL, but they cannot write an academic essay to the level required by their FDU professors. Therefore, without academic writing support, they may receive poor or failing grades.
  • Poor or failing grades in one or more courses will negatively affect a student’s GPA and scholarship and may affect the ability to graduate.
  • Failing a course will mean increased time and expenditures on course work, and it will also lead to increased stress and anxiety.

What Is The EPT?

  • The test provides a prompt: a short paragraph that describes a specific controversial statement.
  • You will write an  argumentative essay that takes a position on the topic given in the prompt.
  • You will give a series of arguments that support your position on the issue.
  • The supportive details can be common knowledge or knowledge gained from your experiences in academic, professional or personal life.

How Is The EPT Conducted?

  • The EPT is conducted online via Zoom .
  • The EPT uses Microsoft’s online platform Office 365 (Word).
  • The EPT is 70 minutes long.

The EPT Example

Below is an example of how the various parts of an essay can be structured to complete the assigned task. Your goal is to demonstrate that you understand the topic and can develop an appropriate framework for responding to the prompt.

  • English Placement Test Example

How Should You Structure Your Written Response?

Create an outline of the essay before you write. Consider the topic and the outline when you write the introduction. Review the introduction and your topic sentences to prepare the conclusion.

Introduction (1 paragraph)

  • This paragraph introduces the topic, providing context or background of the controversy.
  • Do not use broad generalizations about the topic but create a focus that leads the reader to the thesis.
  • The thesis provides a clear statement of your position on this issue.
  • The thesis should control the content (information, evidence, and examples) that is given as support in the body paragraphs.

Body (3 – 5 paragraphs)

  • Organize the points you will make in an order that makes sense and creates a strong argument.
  • In one paragraph, include one idea from the opposing viewpoint. Then argue against that view, providing evidence to show why your position is the correct one.
  • Express your judgment, not your opinion. Judgment is based on evidence; therefore, use the available evidence to establish a valid conclusion.
  • Use a variety of evidence types: information and anecdotal evidence as well as personal experiences and observations.
  • Create clear and meaningful connections throughout your paragraphs.
  • Relate each paragraph explicitly to your position expressed in the thesis. If something does not relate, remove it.

Conclusion (1 paragraph)

  • Remind the reader of the issue and its relevance.
  • Summarize the argument(s) made, without being repetitive, and reinforce your position.

How Is Your EPT Essay Evaluated?

This test measures your ability to write effectively, which is a skill critical to your academic success. Your writing is evaluated on its  content ,  organization,  and  language , as explained below.

CONTENT: The extent to which the essay demonstrates understanding and writing skill in

  • completes the task (persuasive essay)
  • provides reasonable, well-chosen argument and relevant main ideas that control the details
  • expresses your own ideas
  • makes the controlling argument and main ideas clear
  • uses relevant, insightful, and balanced supporting evidence to develop the ideas
  • does not use famous quotes or fabricated data as ‘proof’

ORGANIZATION: The extent to which your writing is

  • the introduction effectively presents the controlling idea, which orients the reader to the purpose, the topic and the position
  • body paragraphs maintain and support the position by using topic sentences that control the evidence provided
  • the concluding paragraph reinforces the stated position and provides closure
  • the main points are given explicitly and are supported by details that clarify, explain, and reassert
  • sentences are carefully constructed to be clear and to follow one another in a logical or reasonable order to create a flow of ideas
  • paragraphs are logically and meaningfully connected to create unity of thought

LANGUAGE: The extent to which your written English is

  • suitable for academic writing, not conversational
  • reflective of the task
  • distanced from the audience
  • concise – e.g., avoiding wordiness and repetition
  • clear – e.g., using suitable word choices
  • sentence forms – e.g., complete sentences; balance of types (simple/complex; varied lengths and structures)
  • grammar and mechanics – e.g., proper use of verb/word forms, subject-verb agreement, articles; commas and periods

What Score Do You Need?

You must score a minimum of  15 out of 18 points  to pursue a full range of courses at the FDU – Vancouver campus.

What If You Don’t Achieve The Minimum Score?

  • If you score between 11 and 14 points, you will be required to take academic writing courses in either the Pre-University Program or in the  Pre-Master’s Program
  • Successful completion of these academic writing courses means you are eligible to take a regular course load in the next trimester
  • If you score less than 11.5 points, you will be required to take a Pathway Program with a Pathway Partner  Institution  off-campus. Once you have successfully completed the pathway program, you will then enter either the Pre-University Program or the  Pre-Master’s Program in the following trimester.

When Will I Receive My Result?

  • Results are sent on Mondays and Wednesdays.
  • Results are not sent during weekends, statutory holidays, and campus closure days. 
  • when the volume is high during busy times (e.g. orientation, mid-terms, finals etc.)
  • when the result is indecisive and needs 
  • Results will be graded within 5 – 7 business days. The grading phase starts the day after your initial test date (delays are subject to bullet point 2). Results are sent no later than 1 business day after the completion of the grading phase.

How Long Is My EPT Result Valid?

Your test result is valid for 2 years from the date of the test if you scored between 11 – 14. If you scored 15+ your test score will not expire.

Can I Re-Take My EPT?

You can take the EPT twice after the original test. The test can only be taken after 2 months of the latest test date.

Can I Be Exempted From Taking The EPT?

For EPT exemption conditions, please click here .

Math Placement Test (MPT)

Why do students need to take the mpt.

  • Student placement in math courses is determined by completing the Accuplacer assessments.
  • Only undergraduate students are required to take the MPT.

What Is The MPT?

  • Student Accuplacer math assessments: Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics (QAS).
  • The assessment is has 20 multiple-choice questions and 2 samples questions.
  • The MPT is 50 minutes long.
  • The assessments are adaptive, which means that the computer automatically determines the next questions based on responses to prior questions. Therefore, once an answer has been selected and confirmed, the question is complete and cannot be revisited.

MPT Example

Below is an example of how the various parts of the math multiple choice questions that are provided to complete the assigned task. Your goal is to demonstrate that you understand topics such as Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics and can develop an appropriate framework for responding to the prompt.

  • Next-Generation Quantitative Reasoning, Algebra, and Statistics (QAS)

EPT & MPT Academic Regulations

I acknowledge that any misrepresentation or falsification of documentation or information will result in the cancellation of admission or registration, or dismissal from the University. Misrepresentation includes any infringements of the  Academic Integrity Policy , such as incidents of plagiarism on the Statement of Purpose, on the English Placement Test and Math Placement Test.

Questions About The EPT & MPT? 

  • Please contact  [email protected] if you have any questions or would like to receive the booking instructions for an English Placement Test [EPT] and/or Math Placement Test [MPT]. If you have paid and taken the EPT and/or MPT the test fee is not refundable.
  • You are allowed to request a refund on your EPT/MPT booking if you cancel it 24 hours prior to your scheduled test date and set time. Cancellation requests made within 24 hours of the test date and time are not eligible for a refund.

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Writing Placement

Welcome to UWP Writing Placement!  Please read through the important placement information on this page.  After reading, please proceed to the Writing Placement website by clicking below.  

Purpose of the Placement

Research has shown that test scores aren’t an accurate indicator of your success as a writer. To more accurately place you into one of our three writing courses, we would like to read a writing sample that is more reflective of the processes writers engage in when they write.

Your Writing Placement

Your writing placement will consist of three parts:

An essay: an original essay based on one of three writing prompts.

A revision plan: a plan for how you might improve your essay if you had more time.

A survey: a survey about your writing experiences creates a snapshot of your incoming freshman class as writers for the University Writing Program.

How Your Placement Is Read

Your placement is anonymously read by experienced instructors in the University Writing Program, and you will be placed into WRIT 1010, 1110, or 1120 based on their evaluation of your placement.  

Essays that place into WRIT 1120, our most advanced writing course, answer the prompt fully, have a focused main claim that is developed with specific evidence, demonstrates adaptation of structures taught in high school, use varied and complex sentence structures, and have few sentence-level errors.

Notes on Completing Your Placement

  • You need to be an undergraduate student entering BGSU and have access to your BGSU email account to access and write your placement.
  • Do not obtain any form of assistance while taking the Writing Placement. This includes consulting with a teacher, parent, or friend for proofreading or editing your written essay. This extends to the use of artificial intelligence language models like ChatGPT. It is imperative that you honor this important part of the placement guidelines. It is to your disadvantage to receive a score higher than your actual abilities. A score that is too high would place you in a course beyond your capabilities with a limited probability of success.

You have 24 hours to complete your placement, which gives you time to explore ideas, draft your essay, revise to improve, and edit to polish. We’re looking to see what you can produce when given more than the standard two-hours in standardized tests, so make the most of the time given you. Your placement determines how many writing classes you are required to take!

You may access the site an unlimited number of times within the 24-hour period, and you may submit your placement at any point within the same 24-hour period. When the 24-hour window ends, however, you will no longer be able to submit work.

You are required to wait one year to resubmit a placement.

You may only submit one placement for consideration.

Your placement results will be emailed to your BGSU email address. You can also learn your placement from your advisor.

When You Should Complete Your Placement

We encourage incoming students to complete the writing placement as soon as possible or no later than two weeks before your scheduled orientation date. The placement website is online and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  

We strongly discourage you from writing your placement the day of your scheduled orientation date or writing your placement on your phone. Again, your placement determines how many writing classes you take.

Message for Second Language and Multilingual Speakers/Writers of English

All undergraduate students are required to complete the UWP writing placement. Second language and multilingual speakers/writers of English may be required to complete ESOL writing courses as prerequisites to the University Writing Program’s WRIT courses. Completing an ESOL speaking/listening placement may also be required. See ESOL Placement Assessment Information or contact [email protected] for more information.

Message for AP Students

Students who score a 3 or higher on AP English Language and Composition Test or the English Literature and Composition Test are not required to complete a placement essay. If you plan to take an AP test this year, you still need to write a Placement essay before May 1 because the AP scores will not be submitted in time for you to be enrolled in your Linked Courses.

I am ready to proceed to the Writing Placement Website (Link)

University writing program (uwp).

215 East Hall Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403 419-372-7885

Dr. Neil Baird, Director [email protected]

Tifanie Knauff, UWP Secretary [email protected]  

English Department

Stephannie Gearhart, Chair English Department Bowling Green State University Bowling Green, OH 43403 419-372-7540 [email protected]

Jeanne R. Berry (she/her/hers) Secretary to the Chair [email protected]

Updated: 06/23/2023 01:52PM

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Table of Contents

Demystifying College Placement Tests

  • November 18, 2023

Demystifying College Placement Tests – Your Path to Academic Success

The excitement and nerves that come with embarking on your college journey are impeccable. It’s a new beginning and a new experience. I remember the anticipation and uncertainty that I felt when I was about to resume college.

Trust me, just like you, I worked so hard to acquire a good score in the entrance exam. However, there were other vital exams waiting for me—college placement tests.

A test that determines your placement in certain coursework, particularly in Mathematics and English. It is crucial in your college career because it helps you realize your ability.

In this brief guide, I will walk you through each stage of college placement tests, from the test concept to interpreting your scores.

Therefore, hang on, and let’s jump right into it.

Understanding College Placement Tests

College placement tests are standardized tests administered to incoming students to assess their academic prowess and appropriately enroll them in courses. The tests typically cover subjects such as English, Reading, Mathematics, and Foreign languages. Students are placed in courses that are challenging but achievable and to help them succeed in college.

A college placement test helps colleges to know you better academically, helping them understand where you shine and where you might need a little extra support. 

This assessment process assists them to place you in the right courses according to your academic skills. 

Typically, placement tests cover subjects, such as Mathematics, English,  Reading, Writing, and Foreign languages. These tests are often taken to see where you’re most comfortable and where you might struggle.

Let me explain in detail. 

What is Placement Testing?

Placement testing is a process of evaluating your skills to place you in a course that matches your proficiency level. 

According to a survey , approximately 90 percent of community college students sit for placement tests before registering for classes. Therefore, don’t be scared because you are not alone.

In most cases, two-year colleges and even four-year colleges provide open and non-competitive admissions. Consequently, a noticeable number of students who lack basic college-level academic qualifications get admitted.

Therefore, many colleges ask their prospective students to take a placement test so that they can evaluate them according to their abilities and enroll them in a certain course.

Unlike other traditional tests, placement tests have no “pass” or “fail. ” Rather, students with lower scores are required to take developmental or remedial courses to enhance certain academic skills.

Types of Placement Tests

There are a number of placement tests available for the students depending on the colleges. However, most colleges prefer to assess their students using these seven placement tests

  • Mathematics
  • Foreign languages
  • Computer and Internet technologies
  • Health and natural sciences

Most community and four-year colleges often require the initial five of these tests.

However, to make the whole testing process efficient for the students, the colleges have generated an integrated computer-based system named the ACCUPLACER test .

What is an ACCUPLACER and how does it work?

ACCUPLACER is a group of tests that colleges administer to assess how well students understand Reading, Writing, and Mathematics.

ACCUPLACER is a testing system that includes a number of tests on subjects, such as Reading, Writing, and Mathematics, to evaluate the incoming students’ capabilities. It helps colleges to place every student in the right courses, aligning with their skill level and academic readiness.

Now, let’s have a closer look at each placement test.

1. Math Placement Test

A Math placement test evaluates your mathematical proficiency. The test covers a wide range of topics such as arithmetic (addition, multiplication, subtraction, decimals, division, and fraction), pre-algebra, algebra, trigonometry, and graphing.

It also covers advanced topics, including parabolas, logarithms, and determinants.

You have 90 min to answer 60 multiple-choice questions, and a score of 30 or higher can get you a great placement in math courses.

To avoid struggle and becoming overwhelmed in advanced courses, it is critical to complete this section.

2. Reading Placement Test

A reading placement test assesses your ability to comprehend what you read. You will be involved in reading different texts and passages. Subsequently, you will be asked to answer multiple-choice questions.

The total number of questions varies per college. In general, you have to answer 30 questions. For more information, check out your college website or contact your college authority.

However, this test will gauge your ability to understand, analyze, and interpret written information . Your placement in English or Literature courses mostly depends on these results.

3. Writing Placement Test

In a writing placement test, students are required to read a brief composition and then compose a coherent essay in response to it.

This test evaluates your grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and thought expression.

Your writing skills might not be good enough for college, even if you did well in high school. Thus, there is a writing placement test requirement from most community colleges for first-year students.

In most cases, you have to submit a passage or thesis within two hours; and this whole process includes topic outlining and writing.

4. English Placement Test

An English placement test evaluates how well you can read and understand written English. The test has three parts: reading, writing, and listening.

Unlike others, an English placement test is not mandatory for every college or university ; however, some of them require it.

For instance, the University of Georgia administers an English placement test that contains 60 questions for a duration of 60 min.

This test will assess your broader language skills, including vocabulary, language usage, and grammar.

5. Foreign language Placement Test

Foreign Language Placement Test or Foreign Language Placement Assessment is designed to assess your foreign language proficiency based on your previous coursework and skill on the language. 

It helps colleges to identify your appropriate level for a particular foreign language course, whether it’s introductory, intermediate, or advanced.

The foreign language test includes questions related to listening, vocabulary, and grammar . 

6. Computer and Internet Technologies Placement Test

A Computer Skill Placement test, also known as Computer Skill Assessment, evaluates your computer literacy and proficiency in using various computer applications and softwares. 

Students who aim to major in technology-related courses are required to sit for this placement test. Through this test, colleges or universities analyze if you have a fundamental understanding of computers, softwares, and hardwares.

Additionally, it examines your basic and advanced knowledge of databases and spreadsheets.

However, the exam consists of multiple-choice questions covering topics such as introduction to computer systems, system software, Microsoft (MS) Word, MS PowerPoint, and MS Excel.

7. Health Science Placement Test

The Health Science Placement Test or TEAS (Test of Essential Academic Skills) examines your entry-level skills of health science in four subjects and assigns the appropriate course to you according to your expertise. 

The four subjects include:

  • English and language usage

Take the TEAS test if you are an applicant for a nursing or radiology program. Moreover, it is a computerized exam consisting of multiple-choice questions.

The table below presents the time and number distribution

Now the question is, what are the possible skills for which you will be questioned?

You will be questioned about:

  • Reading (31%) – Craft and structure, key ideas and details, and consolidation of ideas and knowledge.
  • Math (22%) – Measurements and data, numbers, and algebra.
  • Science (31%) – Scientific reasoning, life and physical science, as well as human anatomy and physiology
  • English and Language Usage (16%) – Vocabulary, knowledge of language, and standard English

Why Are College Placement Tests Essential?

College placement tests are essential because they help colleges to determine if you have the required skills to enroll in college.

They help the college to make an informed decision about the course placements and assist you in your academic career. It ensures you remain in your comfort zone and enjoy the classes.

Your scores in these tests are critical; high scores can open the doors of advanced courses for you.

What Happens if Your College Placement Tests Scores are Low?

You’ll be placed in classes that will help you learn the material before you move on to harder classes if you don’t perform well in a placement test. However, you can’t fail a placement test .

It will lead you to a remedial class, which ultimately helps you to improve. Thus, it’s a win-win situation.

For instance, my high school friend Sarah, who scored exceptionally well in the placement test, resulted in her being placed in advanced Mathematics and Science classes right from the start of college.

This boosted her confidence and helped her to be ahead of schedule.

Conversely, Tom had difficulty in his writing placement test, leading him to enroll in a remedial writing class. Eventually, he improved his skills and excelled in higher-level writing.

Seven Important Preparation Tips for College Placement Tests

The following are seven practical tips on how to prepare effectively for college placement tests—

Understand the Test Format

Familiarize yourself with the format and structure of the placement test. You should have an idea about the types of questions, sections, and time constraints for each section.

Review the Content

Identify the subject areas covered in the placement test. For example, review concepts in algebra, geometry, and arithmetic if it’s a math placement test.

For a writing placement test, develop your grammar, punctuation, and essay writing skills.

Use Official Study Materials

Many placement tests, such as the ACCUPLACER , offer official study materials and practice tests. Utilize them and gain a better understanding of the test content.

Seek Additional Resources

In addition to official study materials, explore other resources including test prep books, online courses, and study guides . There are often free or affordable options available online.

Create a Study Schedule

Design a study schedule according to your learning style and commitments. Dedicate specific periods each day or week because consistency is key; therefore, stick to your schedule.

Break It Down

Divide your study material into sections. Moreover, focusing on one topic or subject area at a time will make studying more manageable.

Practice Regularly

Practice is essential for test preparation. Take practice tests under timed conditions to simulate the actual test environment. It will also help you get accustomed to the pressure of the test.

Taking the Test – Dos and Don’ts

It’s finally the test day! What you should do and what you shouldn’t? Typically, taking a placement test requires exquisite planning and execution. However, to ensure a good score, follow these instructions:

  • Aim to arrive early because arriving late can easily increase your stress levels.
  • Check your test center’s guidelines in advance and bring all the necessary materials (means of identification, pencils, any allowed reference sheet, and calculator).
  • When you start, read each question and prompt carefully . You can first read the questions and identify some keywords if there is a passage. This will help you to answer faster and more efficiently.
  • Smart time management is crucial. Don’t dwell on difficult questions; move on to the next after marking them for review.
  • Answer all the questions if there is no penalty for a wrong answer. An educated guess can earn you points.
  • Check for omissions at the end of every section.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a decent score for college placement tests.

In general, an ACCUPLACER test score between 200 and 230 is considered a low score , while 230 and above is considered a good score . Having said that, I recommend aiming for 260. 

How can I register for placement tests?

To register for a placement test, contact an enrollment advisor who will assess your academic history and inform you whether or not to take a test. Thereafter, sign up on your college website and download the placement test form to register. It may require your school account. Remember, the process can vary depending on the college.

How many times can I take a placement test for college?

You can have two retakes for college placement tests. However, some colleges ask the second retaker students to take the diagnostic version of the placement test as well.

Final Words

College placement tests are pivotal in shaping your academic success. With proper preparation, intellectual guidance, careful execution, and a positive mindset , you can achieve your desire.

These tests aren’t barriers, they are opportunities that are waiting for you; They are ways to showcase your abilities and expertise.

Therefore, embrace them, stay focused, and let them guide you towards a brighter future and success.

Reference Links

·   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Placement_testing

·   https://study.com/academy/popular/how-many-times-can-you-take-the-accuplacer-test.html

·   https://collegeforadults.org/applying-to-college/placement-tests

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Writing placement exam.

This exam is designed to help each incoming student find the writing support and instruction most suited to his or her individual skill level. Eligible students will receive an email notification to take the exam. We recommend that you meet with your advisor as they can provide the most support, but if there are questions, please contact Careen Szarmach at [email protected] and include your name, student information, and the detailed nature of your inquiry. Thank you!

I. Test Directions

Welcome to the CCSU Writing Placement Test! This test is designed to place you into the class that will offer you the best support. To complete the exam effectively, please make sure you have...

  • At least 2 hours and 15 minutes of uninterrupted, undisturbed time available
  • A stable internet connection
  • No other applications running, and no other tabs open (this can cause your laptop or browser to crash)
  • Full power to your computer (if you are using a laptop, please make sure you plug it in; don't rely on the battery!)

You are free to take notes as you prepare your essay. It is also fine for you to refer back to these instructions or to print them out. When you have read everything in this section, please return to the test and complete the Demographic questions before proceeding to the essay section.

The Placement Exam includes demographic questions and an essay section. Each part of the Placement Exam is mandatory, and you cannot continue to the next step until you’ve completed the step you are on. Both your answers to the demographic questions and written response will be used to determine your placement into a writing class.

II. Scoring Criteria

After you submit your essay, it will be read and scored by a member of the English Department’s writing faculty. Your essay will be evaluated on three areas: (1) thesis/controlling idea, (2) use of the reading/citation, (3) and writing genre, tone, and mechanics You can earn up to 4 points for each area. The highest score an essay can receive is 12 points. The grading rubric is on the next page of this document.

Your answers to the demographic questions will be considered in combination with your essay to determine whether a writing class that supports English language learners would be more beneficial to you.

III. Finding Your Placement and Descriptions of Writing Courses

How to Find Out What Your Placement Is:

After submission, your exam will be evaluated by faculty in the CCSU English Department and your writing course placement will be determined: WRT 100, WRT 105/105P, WRT 110, ESL 100, or ESL 105/105P. Your placement result should be available no later than 2-3 weeks after you take the test. You can ask your advisor to tell you which class you have been placed into.

If you’d like to look up your placement yourself:

1. Navigate to Central Pipeline

2. Click the WebCentral—Banner Web button in the middle of the page on the left side.

3. Log in to WebCentral with your email address and password

4. Click on the “Student” tab and scroll down to the Student Information Link

5. Look under Test Scores for your Writing Placement Test score, which indicates your placement. 0=WRT 100 3=ESL 100 1=WRT 105/105P 4=ESL 105/105P 2=WRT 110

Students cannot request to be placed into a different class. However, if you believe you would benefit from more writing support or from a writing class for English language learners and you are not placed into one, you can contact the Director of Composition, Dr. Elizabeth Brewer at [email protected] .

Writing Course Descriptions

Descriptions of the first-year writing classes are below if you would like to know more about them:

WRT 110: Introduction to College Writing is an introductory course in college-level academic writing. It asks students to read complex texts and analyze them, craft arguments in response to them, and conduct their own research on issues. WRT 110 satisfies CCSU’s first-year writing requirement and is 3 credit hours.

WRT 105: Enhanced Introduction to College Writing is an introductory course in college-level academic writing for students who would benefit from additional individual and small-group writing instruction. Students in WRT 105 take the equivalent of the 3-credit WRT 110, supplemented by two additional hours of tutorial assistance in a smaller group. WRT 105 satisfies CCSU’s first-year writing requirement and is 5 credit hours.

WRT 100: Fundamentals of Composition focuses on improvement of basic writing skills to prepare students for WRT 110. The course introduces students to academic writing genres, processes, and practices. Students who are required to take WRT 100 must pass the course with a C- or better before successful completion of 30 hours of coursework at CCSU. WRT 100 does not satisfy CCSU’s first-year writing requirement, but it fulfills a general education Skill Area I requirement, and passing the course with a C- or better qualifies a student to take WRT 110. WRT 100 is 3 credit hours.

Writing Courses for English Language Learners:

ESL 105: ESL Enhanced Introduction to College Writing is an introductory course in college-level academic writing for English language learners would benefit from additional individual and small-group writing instruction. The course shares WRT 110’s focus on reading and responding to complex sources, writing from inquiry, academic conventions, and the writing process. Students in ESL 105 take the equivalent of the 3-credit WRT 110, supplemented by two additional hours of tutorial assistance in a smaller group of English language learners. This tutorial focuses specifically on reading and writing skills for non-native English speakers. ESL 105 satisfies CCSU’s first-year writing requirement and is 5 credit hours.

ESL 100: ESL Fundamentals of Composition focuses on improvement of basic writing skills to prepare students for WRT 110. The course introduces English language learners to American academic writing expectations by teaching sentence and paragraph formation and the development of coherent essays. Students who are required to take ESL 100 must pass the course with a C- or better before successful completion of 30 hours of coursework at CCSU. ESL 100 does not satisfy CCSU’s first-year writing requirement, but it fulfills a general education Skill Area I requirement, and passing the course with a C- or better qualifies a student to take WRT 110. ESL 100 is 3 credit hours.

IV. Technical Problems

Q: i don't know how to get my bluenet id/student id# or my login is not working what do i do.

A: Please contact the IT Help Desk at [email protected] or (860) 832-1720 and include your full name and a description of the exact problem you are experiencing.

Q: While I was taking the test, my computer restarted/shut down/lightning struck my roof/the internet exploded and now I can't get back to my exam is there anything you can do?

A: In the event of a legitimate, technical problem in which you already began to take the exam and then were unable to finish, please email Careen Szarmach at [email protected] with your full name, contact information, student ID# and bluenet ID, and a detailed description of the issue. There is no guarantee of restoring any work done, or of being able to retake the exam, but we will make every effort to address the situation fairly.

Q: I took the test, but I'm not sure my essay was properly submitted and now when I go back to view it on Blackboard, it's not there! Did it get lost?

A: When an essay is submitted for examination, it is no longer available for you to view (which occurs for security reasons). If you believe that there was a technical error, please email Careen Szarmach at [email protected] with your full name, contact information, student ID# and bluenet ID, and the nature of your concern.

IV. Who needs to take the exam, and how are transfer credit/exam exemptions evaluated?

Q: who has to take the placement exam.

A: You must take the writing placement exam unless at least one of the following criteria is true:

  • Your SAT Writing & Language Test score is 31 or higher
  • Your ACT English composite is 23 or higher
  • You are transferring WRT 110-specific credit to CCSU from a previous institution ( Note:  ENG 1xx credit i nsufficient )
  • You earned a 3 or higher on English Language & Composition AP exam ( not the English Literature & Composition AP Exam)
  • You have been admitted to the Honors Program

Students who have course credit that transfers as WRT 110 (not WRT 1xx), who are in the Honors Program, or who have successfully completed the Summer Bridges Program do not need to take the placement exam. If you meet the criteria to take the test and have not received an invitation or if you have received an invitation but meet the criteria for exemption, please email Careen Szarmach at [email protected] with your full name, contact information, student ID# and bluenet ID (if you have them), and an explanation of why you need to be enrolled/exempted.

Q: My test scores aren't in that range, but I still received the letter!

A: Please ensure that CCSU has received your transcripts and test scores; you received the letter because, most likely, we have not yet gotten your scores. If your scores were properly received and you are either above or below the score threshold, please email Careen Szarmach at [email protected] with your full name, contact information, and student ID# and bluenet ID (if you have them).

Q: I have AP Credits; do I still need to take the Writing Placement Exam?

A: A score of 3 or higher on the English Literature and Composition Advanced Placement Exam or the English Language and Composition Advanced Placement Exam will award WRT 110 credit. Please note: It is your responsibility to ensure that your test results have been received and processed by CCSU, and the English Department is not able to do that for you or give you any credit until your exam scores have been officially received by the university.

Q: I have taken a class at another college/university and I want transfer credit for WRT 110; how do I do this?

A: If you have taken a class at a member of ConnSCU (one of the other regional CT universities or a CT community college), please visit this page to find out what transfer credit a class will grant: https://webapps.ccsu.edu/CTAB/CCSU_TransCourses.aspx . If you went to a school not on that list, please contact your advisor to for further information. Please remember that it is your responsibility to ensure that all transferring credits are received by CCSU; you will not be given any credit or exam exemption until they are processed.

Q: I took/am taking the UCONN ECE course - do I still need to take the placement exam?

A: If you successfully complete the program then no, you do not need to take the placement exam. You do need to inform your advisor and to ensure that your credit is sent to and received by CCSU, however, to ensure that you are properly enrolled and that your record is updated.

Q: I am in the honors program. Do I still need to take the placement exam?

A: No. Please contact your adviser to ensure that your record accurately reflects this.

Q: What if I don't care what writing class I get into? Do I still need to take the exam?

A: Yes! And you should care about the class you take as it's a crucial component of your college career!

V. How does the test work and what do I need to do to prepare for it?

Q: how do i take the exam.

A: Log into Blackboard and sign in with your bluenet ID and password. Once there, look to the top-right of your screen and click on "Organizations@CCSU." The link to the Writing Placement Exam should appear; click on it to begin the process (the timer does NOT begin at that moment, so you can browse the materials before you begin). If you do not see the Writing Placement Exam link, please email Careen Szarmach at [email protected] with your full name, contact information, and student ID# and bluenet ID (if you have them).

Q: What is the exam like? How long do I have to take it?

A: You will be asked to read a selected text of approximately 500 words and to respond to specific prompts in a coherent, organized, formal essay of 500-600 words. You will be given two (2) hours to read the text provided and to compose, edit, and submit your essay.

Before you begin, you will be given some information about what we are looking for in your essay, how it will be evaluated, and how that evaluation will determine your placement in a writing class. You may review this information for as long as you like, and any time spent reviewing it will not count against the two (2) hours you have to complete the exam. If you wish, after reviewing the information you may log off and return at another time to write your essay.

After reviewing the evaluation information, you will be asked to answer some demographic questions about your language and writing background. This data will help our faculty decide which writing class is the best fit for you, and your responses will help us better understand the characteristics, goals, and abilities of our student population so that we can improve our program. The time you take to answer these questions will not count against the two (2) hours you have to complete the exam. If you wish, after answering the demographic questions you may log off and return at another time to write your essay.

If you choose to continue, be sure that you have two uninterrupted hours to write your essay because once you begin the process you cannot stop and start again. You will have only one opportunity to take the Placement Exam. When you begin, you will be given a short text to read along with a specific writing prompt to which you will be asked to respond. You will have two hours to read the text, develop your ideas, write your essay, and revise your work before submitting it. After submission, you will be asked to answer two more brief demographic questions that are not part of the two hour, timed writing exam.

Q: Do I need to schedule an appointment?

A: No! The exam is taken online and can be done so at any time, day or night (though taking it as soon as possible is definitely a good decision).

Q: Does the exam cost anything?

A: No, the test is free and requires only access to the internet and a computer. If you do not have internet access at home, you may take the exam from the student computing center on campus, or at any other public terminal.

Q: How do I prepare for the exam?

A: You do not need to prepare for the exam; there isn't a particular subject to study or skill to practice. The goal of the exam is to determine which class best supports your current level of writing ability, so artificially inflating (or depressing) your ability can only hurt you. Just make sure that when you do take the exam, you give yourself 2.5-3 hours of uninterrupted and distraction-free time and a stable internet connection.

Q: What is the deadline to take the exam?

A: You should take the exam as soon as possible. You cannot enroll in a composition course until you do so, and they fill very quickly, so you are in jeopardy of not being able to take a required course if you delay, which may end up delaying your graduation date! We usually offer the exam for newly-admitted Fall semester students from March until the Fall Semester Add/Drop Deadline, and then we re-open it from mid/late October until the add/drop deadline in Spring Semester.

Q: I have a disability and/or need special accommodation. How do I receive support?

A: Please contact Student Disability Services (SDS) and they will ensure that you receive any necessary accommodations. The English Department cannot assist you until you contact SDS and ensure that you are registered, at which point, we will be contacted; we will accommodate you in any way possible.

VI. How is the test scored/Questions about placement

Q: how is the exam graded what does "placement" mean.

A: After submission, it will be evaluated by faculty in the CCSU English Department and your writing course placement will be determined: WRT 100, WRT 105/105P, WRT 110, ESL 100, or ESL 105/105P. Your placement result should be available no later than 2 weeks after you take the test. To determine your score, login to WebCentral and look under Test Scores.

  • WRT 100, WebCentral Score 0
  • WRT 105/105P, WebCentral Score 1
  • WRT 110, WebCentral Score 2
  • ESL 100, WebCentral Score 3
  • ESL 105/105P, WebCentral Score 4

ESL writing classes are designed for students whose first language isn’t English, and they meet the same university general education requirements as their WRT equivalent courses. If you placed into WRT 110 but feel ESL 108 or 109 might be a better fit, you can take one in addition to your writing class. You can register for either class voluntarily, any semester. If you have questions about this, you may contact. Dr. Elizabeth Olson to inquire.

Q: How long will it take to get my score, and how do I view it?

A: You may check back on WebCentral at anytime; when your exam has been scored, the number will be visible. If more than 2 weeks have elapsed since you submitted your exam and you still have not received a score, please email Careen Szarmach at [email protected] with your full name, contact information, student ID# and bluenet ID (if you have them), and the nature of your inquiry.

Q: I took the exam and I disagree with my score...can I retake it and/or challenge my score?

A: We have a very rigorous training program for our placement exam graders, and we make our grading rubric and criteria visible to students even before they take the exam (which you can view on the exam itself), so we feel confident in our results. We do not allow students to retake the exam unless there are exceptional circumstances, but if you believe there is an error that needs to be redressed, please email Careen Szarmach at [email protected] with your full name, contact information, student ID# and bluenet ID (if you have them), and a carefully-written explanation of your concern and warranted action.

VII. My test in BlackBoard Learn has an old date and won't open.

Tests not stay open indefinitely. The testing period runs from March - drop/add in fall semester, and October - drop/add in spring semester. When drop/add comes to a close, the tests do as well. If the tests in your BlackBoard Learn are closed, you will need to be added to a new test. Please email your student ID and bluenet user ID to Careen Szarmach at [email protected] . Tests are emailed every Thursday morning, so manual additions must be emailed to Ms. Szarmach by Wednesday morning.

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Creative ideas: College placement test essay topics

At different points in your studying, you may need to complete a placement test that aims at showing your level of skills on a particular subject. This may be needed for your transition to a language group or for estimating whether you should take additional math courses. Placement tests often consist of two parts: multiple choices and a creative writing task. You may be asked to compose an essay and demonstrate your deep knowledge of the topic in it. However, it can be hard to come up with good college placement test essay topics right on the spot, especially in the conditions of limited time and great responsibility. Therefore, it is useful to design some of the topics beforehand and prepare some theses to use in your future paper. 

To write a decent essay, you need to know the required material really well. Then, once you receive the prompts for writing, you will be able to deal with any theme. Before starting to write the essay itself, try to analyze your topic and see what ideas it contains. Use the brainstorming technique if needed, and note down some key theses that can be included in your paper. As a rule, the college placement test essay topics contain a controversial idea that you need to address. In such cases, you have to take a clear position regarding the issue and defend it with convincing arguments. Thus, before writing, make sure to make up your mind and think how you can prove your point of view effectively. It is better to write down all the facts and arguments that can contribute to your discourse. 

In the conditions of placement test, you will not have time to write a lengthy paper, so it is advisable to use a five-paragraph structure for your essay. Classically, they include introduction, three body paragraphs, and conclusion. You should place the thesis statement at the end of the opening paragraph, making it clear what your essay will try to prove. Then, every paragraph of the essay body should start with an idea that proves or supports the provided argument, and the following sentences should contain the evidence. In fact, not a single sentence of your paper should stand on its own: they all should serve the purpose of confirming the thesis statement. 

Proofreading

When you compose a great piece of writing, it is sure annoying to lose points over some minor errors like typos or formatting mistakes. Therefore, a special attention should be paid to the proofreading phase of work. Check your paper’s structure, grammar, punctuation, word choice, spelling, and format, correcting the mistakes you notice. In addition, make sure that the text is coherent, which means that all the paragraphs are linked one to another by meaning and appropriate linguistic tools. 

Time management

The biggest mistake of everyone dealing with different college placement test essay topics is failing to plan their time properly. At the test, you will have a very limited amount of time, and all your knowledge and mastery will not mean a thing if you do not have enough time to demonstrate them. Thus, the first thing you need to do before working on your essay is to set clear timeframes for each of your work stages. For instance, if you are given 60 minutes to do your task, give yourself 10 minutes for prewriting, 30 minutes for writing, 10 minutes for proofreading, and additional 10 minutes just in case one of the phases takes up longer than planned. 

For you to have an understanding what the college placement test essay topics can look like, we have prepared some examples below.

Ideas for college placement test essay

Social issues.

You may be asked to analyze the current problems of your local community or educational establishment and reflect on them:

  • What is the social issue of your community that requires the fastest solutions?
  • If you were a president of students’ government, what changes would you make in the colleges policies?
  • What do you think the education should raise the nation’s awareness about?

Personal achievements

One of the most common topics for placement tests is describing the successful moments of your studying or career:

  • Did you ever have to organize a group of people and take the leader’s position? Describe your experience.
  • Which traces of your character do you think people value the most? Why?
  • What are the situations of utmost success you have been in? 
See also:  “Tips on passing numerical reasoning test”

Important figures

Making an impression about a student is easier with some information about his or her background and the people who were near. Therefore, an essay on one of the following topics may be required:

  • Who of your surrounding has impacted your career choice the most? Explain how.
  • Does one’s family influence one’s success in life? Share your story.
  • Is teacher’s personality decisive for one’s studying success? Who is your favorite teacher?

Planning future

To test your enthusiasm and willingness to improve, you may be asked to address one of the topics below:

  • What are your long-term goals? Why are they important to you? Which steps are you taking now to achieve them?
  • What are your personal criteria of one’s success? Do you think your life will match them in 20 years? 

Although it is impossible to predict which topics will be given to you, knowing the basics of the test and being prepared is always useful.

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essay writing topics for placement test

Writing Placement at WSU

essay writing topics for placement test

All WSU students planning to enroll in English 101 or an equivalent course must complete the Writing Placement Assessment.

The Writing Placement Assessment:

  • Is only required for students who plan to enroll in English 101 or an equivalent course.
  • Is hosted in the Qualtrics Survey platform.
  • Asks students to reflect on their writing skills and experiences in a few multiple-choice and short-answer questions.
  • Provides an article for students to read (students select between two articles chosen by the English department).
  • Prompts students to write a short essay (600-800 words) in response to the article and upload it into the platform.
  • Is evaluated by trained readers who are also the teachers of first-year writing courses.

Pullman & Global: [email protected] 509-335-7959

Tri-Cities: Writing placement website [email protected]

Vancouver: Writing placement website [email protected]

Spring 2024 Writing Placement Assessment

January 8, 2024 – February 28, 2024 Writing Placement Assessment

This link closes at 11:59 pm on February 28, 2024. Placement results for this link will be available to advisors approximately 1 week after the link expires.

Another link will be opened the morning of February 29th and will run through mid-April for current WSU students needing to enroll in a summer or fall English course.

You will have 48 hours to finish the assessment and your time begins when you click on the link. Use the same computer, Internet browser, and link if you need to take a break and return to the assessment later; do not clear your history or cache. Submissions are read by the evaluation team after the link closes. Results are available for advisors in My.Wsu.

Incoming WSU students

Placement will be available for newly admitted WSU students for fall 2024 around mid-April. Information and access to placement will be posted on this website, so please check back around April 15.

Most Common Questions

Do i need to complete the writing placement assessment.

  • Students who have earned scores of 4 or above on the AP test in English: Language and Composition will receive credit for English 101 and do not have to complete the Writing Placement Process.
  • Students who earned scores of 5 on the AP test in English: Literature and Composition will receive credit for English 101 and do not have to complete the Writing Placement Process.
  • Students who have earned scores of 4 or above on the Higher Level IB English A: Literature or the Higher Level English A: Language and Literature test will receive credit for English 101 and do not have to complete the Writing Placement Process.
  • Students in the Honors College do not need to complete the Writing Placement Process and should contact their advisor or the Honors College for instructions on registering for English 298.
  • Students who are transferring in college English credit should use the Transfer Course Search tool to verify their credit will meet the WRTG requirement.  So long as the transfer credit fulfills WSU’s first-year writing course requirement, students will not need to participate in the English Placement Process.

Additionally, WSU students can complete the UCORE WRTG requirement by taking all three of these 1-credit courses: WRITE 111, WRITE 112, and WRITE 113. See the Writing Program’s WRITE courses in the course catalog for more information.

What about placement results?

Results are not distributed through email. Your advisor will access your results through My.Wsu during your advising meeting during NCO. If you do not attend NCO or you do not have an advising meeting, you can email us with that information and a request for your course placement.

Students are placed into the English course that most supports their unique needs as writers. The placement options include:

  • English 100: This course prepares students for the rigors of academic writing that will be found in English 101. Students must successfully complete both English 100 and English 101 to receive the [WRTG] credit. (My.WSU code 0)
  • English 101: This course provides instruction to develop students’ academic writing, critical thinking, rhetorical strategies, reading and library skills. Successful completion of this course fulfills the [WRTG] credit. (My.WSU code 1)
  • English 101+ 102: Placement into these concurrent courses indicates a level of readiness for academic writing, but also a need for structured assistance with academic writing while completing English 101. The Writing Center administers English 102 through the Small Group Collaborative program. (My.WSU code 2)
  • English 104: This course is designed to introduce non-native speakers of English to writing and reading in the university. This course prepares students for English 105 with focused attention on grammar, syntax, and academic styles of writing. To receive [WRTG] credit, students must successfully complete English 104 and 105. (My.WSU code 4)
  • English 105: This course provides instruction designed to develop academic writing, critical thinking, reading, library skills, and rhetorical strategies for non-native speakers of English. It is an equivalent course to English 101 and carries [WRTG] credit. (My.WSU code 6)
  • English 105+ 107: Placement into these courses provides an introduction to academic writing for multilingual writers whose first language is not English. This placement indicates a writer’s need for structured assistance with academic writing while completing English 105. The Writing Center administers English 107 through the Small Group Collaborative program. (My.WSU code 5)

For more information on the 1-credit classes (Eng 102 and 107) visit the Undergraduate Writing Center’s Courses page .

If you feel an error was made in the evaluation of your essays, you are welcome to contact the Writing Program.

NOTE : Some WSU campuses currently offer only English 101 and English 101 + 102. Contact the appropriate campus Writing Assessment office with questions.

Do I have to complete writing placement in the summer?

The Writing Program hosts writing placement assessments throughout the school year. Typically, there is one assessment link available until about mid-semester (with results posted in time for spring registration) and another from mid-semester until the end of the term. During the summer, it’s best to complete assessment before your scheduled NCO so that they can talk with you about your assigned class, and possibly get you enrolled in that class (if seats are available), but it is not detrimental to complete writing placement at a later time.

Check out our Placement FAQ page if your question is not answered here.

essay writing topics for placement test

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Essay Writing

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Capgemini essay writing test.

Capgemini Essay Writing test was recently introduced in the Capgemini Written English Test.

  • Topics that are generally asked in the Capgemini test are related to Geo-Political issues - Demonetization .
  • Written English Test Capgemini you need to score at least 7 out of 10 marks .

Capgemini essay writing test is of high competition. This section is also known as Capgemini Paragraph Writing Test Questions.

Read our Post on Detailed Syllabus and Online Test Pattern for  Capgemini here , they have just changed their Syllabus in March.

Adaptive/Non Adaptive

Non Adaptive

Negative Marking

Capgemini Written English Test Questions

Topics for essay writing in capgemini paper.

  • First Campus Interview Experience
  • My Best Friend
  • Are we too dependent on Computers
  • Digitization and its benefits
  • My last vacation with Parents

Tips and Tricks for Essay Writing in Capgemini

A number of words that you write do not matter, to be honest.

Capgemini Paragraph Writing Test Questions

A 300-word essay is enough. What they will award points or deduct points on are the following –

Punctuations

  • Paragraphisation(Divide in 2/3 Para)
  • Using heavy words that are considered to be proficient in English will not award extra points
  • Thus it is advisable to write in normal English with good grammar and spelling and punctuation.

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Most Important topics:-

  • Hard work or talent - which is more important to succeed in the workplace?
  • Knowledge gained with experience is more important than the knowledge gained from books?
  • Is cloning a good option to capture quality talent? Violent video games affect children negatively?
  • Are corrupt but efficient politicians better than honest but inefficient politicians?
  • Education – Importance in the development of the country
  • Your Favorite Sportsperson
  • Reservation in India
  • Effect of Mobile Phones on Teenagers
  • My Dream job
  • Is Climate change real?
  • Write an essay on ‘Learning vs Understanding’.
  • Spending habits drifting away financial security
  • What are the effects of video games on teenagers these days
  • Give your views on the necessity of daily exercise and should it made compulsory in the Indian education system?
  • Success comes to those who take risks.
  • Impact of social networking & social networking sites
  • Views on manual or automated work through software
  • Education needs to be practical
  • A person's Education achievement depends upon family, friends, and society. give your views for or against this topic

Tips and Tricks for Capgemini Essay Writing

The number of words that you write does not matter, to be honest.

Capgemini Essay Writing Test Questions

essay writing topics for placement test

Capgemini Essay Topics Analytics 2023

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Capgemini Essay Writing Topics based FAQ’s

Ques. is there any sectional cut off for capgemini essay writing topics section.

Ans. Yes, you need to have at least 75%ile in the essay marks to clear this round.

Ques. In how much time do I need to solve or write Capgemini Essay Writing Section?

Ans. You will be given 20 mins to solve Capgemini Essay Writing Section and which you must do carefully without any spellings mistake.

Ques. How many words of Essay is enough to be written in the capgemini essay topics section?

Ans. For capgemini essay topics we think an Essay of around 150 – 180 words must be enough but you may write more if you want to but definitely ignore errors.

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4 comments on “Capgemini Essay Writing Test”

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How to handle and get well rating in Capgemini essay writing test…

essay writing topics for placement test

Go through our Online Classes we have covered all the Points regarding Essay Writing. Link for which is – https://prepinsta.com/capgemini-online-classes/

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which type of essay topics they ask and from where i can get answer

essay writing topics for placement test

Hy Somya, You can go through our Online Classes as you’ll get idea about the essay topics. Link for which is – https://prepinsta.com/capgemini-online-classes/

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COMMENTS

  1. PDF Writing Placement Test Student Preparation Information

    Understanding the Writing Placement Test Prompts Reading passages will always be followed by two essay topics (A and B) to choose from. Question A will always state the following: "In your own words, discuss the author's most important ideas. Do you agree or disagree with the author? Support your ideas by discussing the passage above

  2. Download and practice with free sample questions

    WritePlacer and WritePlacer ESL guides show you the types of prompts you might see on the WritePlacer tests, as well as examples of responses to those prompts, the scores they received, and why they received those scores. Download WritePlacer Guide with Sample Essays

  3. PDF WritePlacer

    ACCUPLACERWritePlacer Guide with Sample Essays. 202 College Board. 1. Introduction to WritePlacer. WritePlacer ® assesses the writing skills of new college students. Test scores help colleges determine whether a student is ready for college-level coursework or would benefit from developmental instruction before taking credit-bearing courses.

  4. Accuplacer Essay Sample Topics

    Defend a Choice When defending a choice, examinees take a position in response to the prompt and then support their decision through relevant examples; keep in mind that there are no right or wrong...

  5. Writing Placement Test

    Testing Services Placement Tests Writing Placement Test Writing Placement Test To demonstrate college-ready writing skills, review the testing scores summary to determine if you need to take placement testing. Writing Placement Test FAQ What is the Accelerated Learning Program? Who needs the writing placement test? How does the test work?

  6. Sample English Essay and Evaluation

    Placement Testing Sample Essays Below are two sample essays. Both essays are in response to the writing prompt below. The first sample essay demonstrates a readiness for English Composition I (a writing course required in all degree programs).

  7. How to Write an Essay for a College Placement Exam

    How to Write an Essay for a College Placement Exam. When just beginning or transferring to a college, students may be required to take a college placement exam that includes math, reading and writing tests. As part of the writing exam, students are expected to write an argumentative essay that states a clear position ...

  8. PDF Strategies for Essay Writing

    understand why it's worth writing that essay. A strong thesis will be arguable rather than descriptive, and it will be the right scope for the essay you are writing. If your thesis is descriptive, then you will not need to convince your readers of anything—you will be naming or summarizing something your readers can already see for themselves.

  9. PDF ACCUPLACER TEST PREPARATION: WRITING

    Instructions, Essay Elements and Scoring for the Writing Placement Test Top Five Tips for Writing a Successful Essay for the Accuplacer Test Sample Essays with Scorer's Commentary Appendix: Tip Sheets Writing a Thesis Statement Using Transitional Words and Phrases The Basic Five Paragraph Essay Essay Outline Worksheet

  10. PDF ENGLISH PLACEMENT TEST STUDY GUIDE

    Tips for Writing the Placement Test When grading placement tests, our readers are looking for coherent, developed, and ... • Do not introduce a new idea or topic that belongs in the body of your essay. • Avoid ending with a rephrased thesis statement and summary of your essay. Example Essay .

  11. Reading/Essay Placement Test Resources

    We highly encourage students to study/review prior to testing. below are some sites you may find helpful. Accuplacer Sample Questions Accuplacer Web-Based Study App Essay Practice & Resources Khan Academy(link) Purdue Owl (link) Guide with Sample Essays (PDF) Guide with Sample Essays (PDF)

  12. How to Write an Essay for a College Placement Exam

    Avoid writing every sentence with a subject followed by a verb and its direct object. Instead of writing, "The professor was impatient with the class and decided to give it a test," try a variation such as "Impatient with his class, the professor decided it was time for a test.". Save at least 5 minutes before time is up to proofread ...

  13. PDF BSU Writing Placement Essay Prep Packet

    By writing the strongest essay you can write for the placement essay, you help to insure correct placement in your first year writing class. To help you to be as prepared as possible to do your best work, we are including a number of documents here: A copy of a previous writing prompt on the value of a liberal arts education.

  14. English Placement Test Essay Examples

    English Placement Test Essay Examples You will find English placement test essay examples for your college entrance exam on this page. In the writing section of the test, you will see literary nonfiction, essays, and informational passages. The passages are around 300 words in length and there are five questions on each one.

  15. English Placement Test (EPT) & Math Placement Test (MPT)

    The test provides a prompt: a short paragraph that describes a specific controversial statement. You will write an argumentative essay that takes a position on the topic given in the prompt. You will give a series of arguments that support your position on the issue.

  16. PDF Sample Essay Prompt for The Csn English Placement Exam

    Prepare a multiple-paragraph writing sample of about 300-600 words on the topic below. Plan, are concerned that the state's requirements for core courses in mathematics, English, science, and social studies may prevent students from taking important elective courses like music, foreign languages, and vocational education.

  17. Writing Placement

    Your writing placement will consist of three parts: An essay: an original essay based on one of three writing prompts. A revision plan: a plan for how you might improve your essay if you had more time. A survey: a survey about your writing experiences creates a snapshot of your incoming freshman class as writers for the University Writing Program.

  18. Demystifying College Placement Tests

    3. Writing Placement Test. In a writing placement test, students are required to read a brief composition and then compose a coherent essay in response to it. This test evaluates your grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and thought expression. Your writing skills might not be good enough for college, even if you did well in high school.

  19. Writing Placement Exam

    English Writing Placement Exam Writing Placement Exam This exam is designed to help each incoming student find the writing support and instruction most suited to his or her individual skill level. Eligible students will receive an email notification to take the exam.

  20. Accuplacer WritePlacer Test: Practice & Study Guide

    Accuplacer WritePlacer Test: Revision & Mechanics. Ch 7. Accuplacer WritePlacer Flashcards. Ch 8. Accuplacer WritePlacer Test Essay Tips & Practice. Get the help you need before taking the ...

  21. College Placement Test Essay Topics

    Writing. In the conditions of placement test, you will not have time to write a lengthy paper, so it is advisable to use a five-paragraph structure for your essay. Classically, they include introduction, three body paragraphs, and conclusion. You should place the thesis statement at the end of the opening paragraph, making it clear what your ...

  22. Writing Placement

    Prompts students to write a short essay (600-800 words) in response to the article and upload it into the platform. ... Students who have earned scores of 4 or above on the AP test in English: Language and Composition will receive credit for English 101 and do not have to complete the Writing Placement Process. ... Students in the Honors ...

  23. FACE Prep

    There is no essay writing round for this hiring program. Capgemini Essay Writing Syllabus - Old Pattern. Capgemini Essay writing topics have no particular syllabus. These essay writing topics were based on current happening or trending topics. The Capgemini essay writing test was used to analyze your grammar, vocabulary, writing skills, and ...

  24. Capgemini Essay Writing Topics Sections 2023

    Topics that are generally asked in the Capgemini test are related to Geo-Political issues - Demonetization. Written English Test Capgemini you need to score at least 7 out of 10 marks. Capgemini essay writing test is of high competition. This section is also known as Capgemini Paragraph Writing Test Questions.